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History

We have endeavoured to create a history curriculum that will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. They will have an understanding of the history of Britain from early times to the 20th Century and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. 

We have identified a chronological narrative using concepts and themes that link learning together to help children make sense of what they learn both in History and across the curriculum. Each unit will build on the last and look to the next in a progression of knowledge and historical skills. Aspects of world history will be linked to contemporaneous aspects of the history of Britain: studies of Ancient civilisations of Egypt (Year 4) and Greece (Year 5) are compared to Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages and Celtic Britain. The Roman Empire is explored as a means of bringing aspects of Ancient Greek civilisation to Britain. The invasion of Britain by Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings is explored through the resistance of populations and key figures involved (Year 4). Anglo Saxon Britain is studied in more detail and compared to Celtic Britain. Children will understand how England was created under Edward the Confessor from smaller kingdoms (Year 4). 

By studying the Tudor period in Year 5, children will focus on the effect of the conflict between Protestants and Catholics and the beginnings of globalisation with exploration of the globe. Colonisation and the development of the British Empire will be explored during study of the Victorian period in Year 6. Children will also understand the significant social changes that happened in Britain at this time with particular reference to the lives of children. Studies of Britain during World War 2 (Year 6) focus on the social changes that occurred in the lives of women and children as well as significant events of the war itself. 

Through historical study, children will understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and impact, they will pose historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts and analyses. They will understand how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims and how contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.